Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    About

  1. What is the ‘ESCAP Sasakawa Award’?
  2. Who developed the ‘ESCAP-Sasakawa Award’?
  3.  

    Nominations

  4. Who can nominate a business for the Award?
  5. Which companies are eligible?
  6. Which countries and territories are included within the ESCAP region?
  7. Can a company be nominated for more than one Award?
  8. Can a non-business organization be nominated for the Award?
  9. Can social enterprises or non-profit organizations apply?
  10. Can state-owned enterprises apply?
  11.  

    Submissions

  12. In what languages can I submit a nomination?
  13. If my supporting documentation, such as proof of business registration, is not in English, must I get it translated?
  14. Do I need to get copies of any supporting documentation or translations notarized?
  15.  

    Definitions

  16. How do you define a “multinational enterprise”?
  17. How do you define a “national or subnational enterprise”?
  18. Should subsidiaries or affiliates of a multinational enterprise apply for the multinational award category, or the national and subnational award category?
  19. How do you define an “entrepreneurial business”?
  20. What do you mean by “excellence and innovation”?
  21. What is meant by a “disability-inclusive organizational culture”?
  22. What are “disability-inclusive products and services”?
  23. What is an “enabling working environment”?
  24.  

    Jury

  25. Who will be the jury members?
  26. How fair can the competition be at such a wide regional level?
  27.  

    Recognition

  28. What kind of public recognition will be provided to winners?
  29.  

    Entrepreneurial Award prize money

  30. What can the entrepreneurial business category prize money be used for?
  31. How is the precise size of the prize money for the winner of the entrepreneurial business window determined?
  32. Is the winner of the Award for the entrepreneurial business window chosen based on the disability-inclusive activities that they have undertaken thus far, or on the new project proposed if they win the prize money?

 


 

    About

  1. What is the ‘ESCAP Sasakawa Award’?
  2. In line with the Incheon Strategy to ‘Make the Right Real’, and in support of the Asian and Pacific Decade of Persons with Disabilities, 2013–2022, the ESCAP-Sasakawa Award has been developed to:

    • Publicly recognize and reward businesses that demonstrate good practices in responding to the needs of persons with disabilities in their business operations.
    • Raise awareness regarding the opportunities available to the private sector for inclusion of persons with disabilities in businesses
    • Catalyse Asia-Pacific leadership in disability-inclusive business.

  3. Who developed the ‘ESCAP-Sasakawa Award’?
  4. The ESCAP-Sasakawa Award was developed in partnership by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), The Nippon Foundation (TNF), and the Asia-Pacific Development Center on Disability (APCD).

     

    Nominations

  5. Who can nominate a business for the Award?
  6. Companies can nominate themselves, or be nominated by a third party (third parties can nominate more than one company). However, prior approval must be given by the CEO or Board of Directors of the company being nominated. Each company may only apply, or be nominated on their behalf, for one of the three Award categories.

  7. Which companies are eligible?
  8. Nominations are open to all commercial enterprises that are operating within one or more of the countries and territories of the ESCAP region, that have been operational since May 2012 at the latest. For multinational enterprises, the disability-inclusive business practice must have both originated, and be currently implemented, within the enterprise’s business activities in the ESCAP region.

  9. Which countries and territories are included within the ESCAP region?
  10. The countries and territories included within the ESCAP region are: Afghanistan; American Samoa; Armenia; Australia; Azerbaijan; Bangladesh; Bhutan; Brunei Darussalam; Cambodia; Cook Islands; China; Democratic People’s Republic of Korea; Fiji; French Polynesia; Georgia; Guam; Hong Kong, China; India; Indonesia; Iran (Islamic Republic of); Japan; Kazakhstan; Kiribati; Kyrgyzstan; Lao People’s Democratic Republic; Macao, China; Malaysia; Maldives; Marshall Islands; Micronesia (Federated States of); Mongolia; Myanmar; Nauru; Nepal; New Caledonia; New Zealand; Niue; Northern Mariana Islands; Pakistan; Palau; Papua New Guinea; Philippines; Republic of Korea; Russian Federation; Samoa; Singapore; Solomon Islands; Sri Lanka; Tajikistan; Thailand; Timor-Leste; Tonga; Turkey; Turkmenistan; Tuvalu; Uzbekistan; Vanuatu; and Viet Nam.

  11. Can a company be nominated for more than one Award?
  12. No. A company must be able to identify with, and will therefore only be able to nominate itself for, one of the three Award categories.

  13. Can a non-business organization be nominated for the Award?
  14. No. All nominees must be profit-oriented commercial enterprises.

  15. Can social enterprises or non-profit organizations apply?
  16. Social enterprises or non-profit organizations that are financially supported in full or in part by business or commercial activities are eligible for nomination. However, organizations relying solely on grants, donations, or some other kind of voluntary or philanthropic support to fund their activities, are ineligible.

  17. Can state-owned enterprises apply?
  18. Wholly or partially state-owned enterprises are eligible for nomination, as long as they are formally registered and seek to generate earnings.

     

    Submissions

  19. In what languages can I submit a nomination?
  20. For logistical reasons, we regret to advise that only nominations in English can be accepted for this Award.

  21. If my supporting documentation, such as proof of business registration, is not in English, must I get it translated?
  22. Yes. When submitting any such documentation, an English translation should also be appended to the document.

  23. Do I need to get copies of any supporting documentation or translations notarized?
  24. Notarizations of all supporting documents are welcome, but not mandatory. All nominees must sign/accept the declaration on the application form that confirms all the information provided, including supporting documents, is true and verifiable. Any nominee found to have falsified information will be automatically disqualified.

     

    Definitions

  25. How do you define a “multinational enterprise”?
  26. A multinational enterprise is a company with offices or operations based within multiple countries and territories of the ESCAP region. Multinational enterprises may additionally have offices or operations based outside the ESCAP region, however, to be eligible for the ‘ESCAP-Sasakawa Award’, the nominated disability-inclusive business practice must have both originated, and be currently implemented, within the enterprise’s business activities in the ESCAP region.

  27. How do you define a “national or subnational enterprise”?
  28. A national or subnational enterprise is a company headquartered and with any additional offices and employees located within the same ESCAP country or territory. The enterprise’s business activities may span the whole country or territory, or be contained within just a part of the country or territory.

  29. Should subsidiaries or affiliates of a multinational enterprise apply for the multinational award category, or the national and subnational award category?
  30. If over 50 per cent of the subsidiary or affiliate company's ownership is held by one or more local (host country) investors, then the company should apply under the national and sub-national enterprise category. If over 50 per cent of the subsidiary or affiliate company's ownership is held by one or more overseas investors, then you should apply under the multinational enterprise category.

  31. How do you define an “entrepreneurial business”?
  32. An entrepreneurial business is a start-up company that in 2013 had annual revenue of between US$ 50,000 and US$ 1,000,000.

  33. What do you mean by “excellence and innovation”?
  34. The ESCAP-Sasakawa Award is seeking to promote innovative disability-inclusive business practices in the region and beyond. The jury will be looking for those businesses that have gone beyond the ‘business-as-usual’ or compliance perspective to design, develop and implement new and unique ways of expanding their reach and impact on people with disabilities, as a key component of their business models.

  35. What is meant by a “disability-inclusive organizational culture”?
  36. A business’s value chain will typically involve a range of elements, from research and design, to product or service development, input purchasing and operations, through to distribution, sales and marketing, and customer service. Disability-inclusive businesses integrate persons with disabilities across most or all of these elements in their business model. Such an approach requires pro-active support from all levels within an enterprise, potentially involving a wide range of participants, both inside and outside the company: senior management, supervisors, human resources personnel, product designers, suppliers, contractors, retail staff, building managers, marketers, advertising agencies, and so on.

  37. What are “disability-inclusive products and services”?
  38. Disability-inclusive products and services are tailored specifically towards persons with disabilities - whether as customers, clients, employees or business partners. Products include assistive devices. Services include examples such as retail site accessibility and specialized audio-visual and interpersonal customer services. Disability-inclusive products and services can also be ‘universally designed’ in that they are designed from the perspective of catering to the needs of both persons with and without disabilities (with an accessibility function” e.g. drinking water with braille and mobile with accessibility function.)

    A disability-inclusive business also recognises the full extent of needs required by persons with disabilities, throughout the business cycle, including beyond the point of purchase. Services such as appropriate and accessible communication interfaces, coupled with relevant staff training, can therefore also be necessary in order to ensure that the full extents of customer care can be provided. These can either be universally designed, or tailored specifically to suit the needs of persons with disabilities.

  39. What is an “enabling working environment”?
  40. An enabling working environment provides both the physical and institutional setting to provide inclusive services for existing employees, and also gives employers maximum exposure and unrestricted access to the widest possible talent pool, including persons with disabilities. Examples of physical accommodations include ramps, lifts and other assistive devices, as well as accessible information. Institutional elements include workplace policies and human resource procedures, such as recruitment, selection and appointment, career guidance and development, and retention/return to work policies.

     

    Jury

  41. Who will be the jury members?
  42. The jury will be comprised of highly respected and recognized international representatives from organizations for persons with disabilities and also the business and finance community.

  43. How fair can the competition be at such a wide regional level?
  44. As the ‘ESCAP-Sasakawa Award’ is a regional initiative, the jury will be comparing innovations within business models across a diverse range of social and economic contexts. The panel will therefore consider carefully the widely differing operating environments, such as the particular national development and legislative setting, of all nominees.

     

    Recognition

  45. What kind of public recognition will be provided to winners?
  46. The ESCAP-Sasakawa Award ceremony will be held in conjunction with commemorations for the ‘International Day for Persons with Disabilities’ 2013. The winners will additionally receive public exposure through relevant announcements within the ESCAPSasakawa Award website and associated press releases, and also through relevant promotional material and associated networks of the three award partners. The three award partners will also seek to harness promotional channels that are relevant to the specific business audiences of the individual winners.

     

    Entrepreneurial Award prize money

  47. What can the entrepreneurial business category prize money be used for?
  48. The entrepreneurial business category prize money is intended to enable the winner to further expand or develop their existing initiative, so as to strengthen their capacity to deliver disability-inclusive products, services and business opportunities within the ESCAP region. Nominees for this category are therefore required to also submit a project proposal, along with their application for assessment, detailing how they would use the prize money in pursuit of this goal. For further details, please see the relevant guidelines at http://www.di-business-award.com/apply.

  49. How is the precise size of the prize money for the winner of the entrepreneurial business window determined?
  50. This will be based on the project budget proposed in the nomination submission. The size of the prize will not exceed the total budget cost of the project proposed by the winning nominee, and may even be less. The jury will expect to see value for money and sensible budgeting for the project, relative to the impact expected from the disability-inclusive business proposal.

  51. Is the winner of the Award for the entrepreneurial business window chosen based on the disability-inclusive activities that they have undertaken thus far, or on the new project proposed if they win the prize money?
  52. The jury will base their decision on an assessment of both the impact of the existing disability-inclusive activities, and the benefits to be gained in further development of the concept as defined by the submitted proposal. This differs from the other two categories – multinational enterprises, and sub-national and national enterprises – where only their existing disability-inclusive activities will be assessed by the jury.